Why I love being self-employed (Part 3)

They say a change is as good as a rest, and I get that change more often than most. Everyone is different, and for some people having their own class and their own classroom is the best thing in the world, but I thrive on variety.

I love the freedom of moving from class to class and from school to school. I really enjoy borrowing somebody else’s class for a short while, and spending time with lots of different children. I take great delight in seeing how other people set up their classrooms. I like not having to look at the same wall display for half a term. In fact I love seeing the creativity and flair that other teachers bring to their displays and being enthralled by a new one each day.

I’m lucky because I get the chance to teach the same objectives to different children from different backgrounds using ideas planned by different teachers, which gives me a real feel for what works and what doesn’t, so my teaching is constantly improving.

Yes, it’s sometimes difficult to have to break the ice in new staffrooms, but on the whole teachers are a friendly bunch. People often say that in teaching no two days are ever the same, and for me this is especially true.

Why I love being self-employed (Part 2)

How many people get to pick and choose the parts of the job they enjoy and not have to do the rest? Not many, but I’m one of the lucky ones. This year I have spent a big proportion of my week teaching languages which is my biggest passion. I’ve done mostly French, but also some Spanish, German, Latin, BSL, Maori, Italian and Portuguese. I felt really proud when one of my year 1 children sang a Latin solo in the Christmas play!

I’ve also undertaken a lot of 1-2-1 tuition, which I’ve really enjoyed. I feel very privileged to have been able to spend time working closely with under-achieving children in several schools, watching them grow in confidence as they realise that they can do it, and then watching them really take-off when they realise they can do it on their own.

And I’ve had all the fun of working on themed days. This term we had a water themed day (maths: how much water could you save in a year by showering for 1 minute less each day; English: debating whether or not water should be free; geography/PSHE: looking at countries where people don’t have access to clean water) and a 1960s day.

I don’t know yet what September holds, but I’m sure that whatever I do I’m going to love every minute just as much as I have this year.

Why I love being self-employed (Part 1)

Over the last few weeks, my teaching colleagues up and down the country have been embarking on a marathon of report writing. Facebook statuses and Twitter feeds have been a countdown of how many reports they have left to write. They have been comparing, and congratulating or commiserating. I, on the other hand, spent my half term holiday enjoying the summer weather, tackling the pile of books I’d been wanting to read, and recharging my batteries, so that I could come back for the last half term feeling refreshed and ready to give my all for the remaining few weeks.

Now that we are back, some teachers are still rushing to get the last comments written before the deadline, whereas I have all the time in the world to concentrate on preparing my lessons for the real part of the job – teaching. Why would I ever want to change that?

Letter to Michael Gove

Dear Mr Gove

I have read the stories in the news about the government’s proposal for a compulsory reading list for primary school children, and I am asking you to reconsider.

I have had a love of books and reading all my life. From the time I could crawl, I headed towards my dad’s bookshelves and sat happily turning the pages of books I was incapable of understanding. By the time I was two, I was able to read them, and I have been reading in every spare minute I have ever since.

I have read everything from War and Peace to Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, and from Ovid (in Latin) to JK Rowling. I’ve read Asimov and Zola, Oscar Wilde and Lee Child, The Lord of the Rings and Lord of the Flies. But I’ve never read Of Mice and Men. And I never will. I’ve been told it’s a classic. I’m told it’s a fantastic book. I will never know for sure. Why not? Because when I was at secondary school, my well-intentioned English teacher forced me to read The Red Pony and The Pearl, and I hated them and I’m never going to read John Steinbeck again for as long as I live.

If being forced to read something has given a child who loved to read such a hatred that it is still with her 30 years later, just think what effect it would have on the minds of children who are already reluctant to pick up a book.

I agree that most primary school children need to read more, but we need to encourage them, not dictate to them.

As a teacher I have succeeded in turning children on to books. I have tempted them with books as varied as Percy Jackson and Tom Sawyer. I haven’t done it by forcing them to read; I have done it by reading them little snippets from books I thought they might enjoy, and then allowing them to choose whether or not they read the book.  I have been rewarded with comments such as, “Tom Sawyer is brilliant, Miss! Did this author write anything else?” and “I’ve finished all the Percy Jackson books. What else might I like?” Would I have achieved the same result by ordering them to read the books? I doubt it.

We’re all on the same side, and we all want our children to be better read. With this proposal the government can turn them into children who have read some books. Given the freedom to exercise our professional judgement, based on what we know of each individual child’s interests, we teachers can turn them into readers.

Sally-Jayne Braisby