Why I love being self-employed (Part 2)

How many people get to pick and choose the parts of the job they enjoy and not have to do the rest? Not many, but I’m one of the lucky ones. This year I have spent a big proportion of my week teaching languages which is my biggest passion. I’ve done mostly French, but also some Spanish, German, Latin, BSL, Maori, Italian and Portuguese. I felt really proud when one of my year 1 children sang a Latin solo in the Christmas play!

I’ve also undertaken a lot of 1-2-1 tuition, which I’ve really enjoyed. I feel very privileged to have been able to spend time working closely with under-achieving children in several schools, watching them grow in confidence as they realise that they can do it, and then watching them really take-off when they realise they can do it on their own.

And I’ve had all the fun of working on themed days. This term we had a water themed day (maths: how much water could you save in a year by showering for 1 minute less each day; English: debating whether or not water should be free; geography/PSHE: looking at countries where people don’t have access to clean water) and a 1960s day.

I don’t know yet what September holds, but I’m sure that whatever I do I’m going to love every minute just as much as I have this year.

Why I love being self-employed (Part 1)

Over the last few weeks, my teaching colleagues up and down the country have been embarking on a marathon of report writing. Facebook statuses and Twitter feeds have been a countdown of how many reports they have left to write. They have been comparing, and congratulating or commiserating. I, on the other hand, spent my half term holiday enjoying the summer weather, tackling the pile of books I’d been wanting to read, and recharging my batteries, so that I could come back for the last half term feeling refreshed and ready to give my all for the remaining few weeks.

Now that we are back, some teachers are still rushing to get the last comments written before the deadline, whereas I have all the time in the world to concentrate on preparing my lessons for the real part of the job – teaching. Why would I ever want to change that?