A Day in the Life of a Self-employed Teacher

Recently I signed up to a blogging challenge and one of the suggestions was to write a blog post about a typical day. That sounds all well and good…..except that I don’t have a typical working day!

Often I have work booked in in advance, which is great.  On those days I get ready for work and I go. Other days I wait to see if the phone rings. Most days it does and off I go to work. Other days it doesn’t and then I work from home.

But, whether the phone rings at the last minute, or the day is booked in advance, the work I do when I get there is the same though – right? Er…no! I teach across a whole range of ages, and teach every subject on the primary curriculum as well as specialising in languages.  One day I could be playing dolls houses and making chocolate crispie cakes in Nursery; the next teaching French to graduates at a local university. The day after that could be a 1960s themed day with Year 6, followed by a day split between Years 1 and 2 doing some Latin. The week could end with a day teaching deaf children.

On those days when I work from home the days are still varied. I maintain my own website and this blog, and also have responsibility for my husband’s website and blog for his tour guiding business. There are always emails that need answering and I sometimes proofread my husband’s translation work for him. I’m part of Team 100WC so I make sure I find time to read the children’s writing and leave comments for them.

I also take my CPD seriously, so a work from home day will include doing my homework for my British Sign Language level 3 course and reading and research for a level 3 course in Dyslexia Awareness, Support and Screening.

Four evenings a week and Saturday mornings I do private tuition for children aged 6-12, but again every lesson is different. Some of the children I work with need help with just maths, some just English and some both. Some have dyslexia and need a different sort of help, and some find the work they do at school easy and need stretching. As if that wasn’t enough variety, I am planning to branch out into 11+ tuition, and language teaching for businesses as well.

So – thanks very much to Nikki Pilkington for the suggestion in her 30 Day Blogging Challenge, but I’m afraid this is about as typical as it gets!

The Spanish Armada and the Daydreaming Child

A few weeks ago, while working in a school as a supply teacher, I taught a lesson about Spain, and I was finding out from the children what they already knew.

One of them said he had heard of the Spanish Armada, but he wasn’t really sure what it was. I asked if anyone else in the class knew anything about it, and immediately little Alfie* put his hand up. Now I would have sworn this kid hadn’t been listening – he’d been fiddling with his pencil and staring into space – so it was with trepidation that I asked what he knew. I was expecting a random observation about the weather outside, or a family member’s up-coming birthday. Instead I got this:

King Philip II of Spain was married to Queen Mary so he sort of ruled England as well. When Queen Mary died he wanted to stay in charge of England, so he asked Queen Elizabeth I to marry him. She didn’t like him so she said no. King Philip was so cross that she wouldn’t marry him that he raised a fleet of ships – called an Armada – to attack England. It didn’t do any good though because he lost.

Wow! Never, ever under-estimate the child you think isn’t listening!

* not his real name