What are Las Posadas?

Las Posadas are processions which take place in Mexico on nine consecutive evenings leading up to Christmas Eve. A boy and a girl are chosen to represent Mary and Joseph and they process through the town, carrying lanterns and candles, and re-enacting the story of Joseph and Mary being turned away from the inns.

They sing at each of the houses they stop at. Each night a different house is  chosen to be the one that offers shelter, and a party is hosted there. There is a meal with carols (called villancicos), small gifts of fruit and sweets are exchanged and the children break a piñata shaped like a star.

The Festival of the Virgin of Guadeloupe

The Virgin Mary is the patron saint of Mexico. The story says that she appeared three times in December 1531 to a poor man by the name of Juan Diego. Each time, she told him to tell the bishop to build a church on that spot.

After the first two appearances the bishop didn’t believe the story, but after the third time a rose bush grew on the spot where she had appeared, and her image could be seen on Juan Diego’s cloak. After that, the bishop believed him and the church, the Basilica de Guadeloupe, was built.

The festival of the Virgin of Guadeloupe begins the Christmas celebrations in Mexico. It   lasts for nine Days, from 3rd to 12th December and pilgrimages are made to the church during this time. On the 11th December there are fireworks and light displays and people dance until the following morning which is her feast day.

The story of the Flor de Nochebuena

Once upon a time, everyone in Mexico was taking flowers to the church. It was Christmas time and they were taking them to offer the baby Jesus as a welcoming gift.

One young girl was so poor that she couldn’t afford any flowers, so she stopped at the roadside and gathered up a bunch of weeds. People pointed and laughed at her as she arrived at the church.

“You can’t give weeds to the baby Jesus!” said one lady, horrified.

“Show some respect or go away!” cried a young man in disgust.

Undeterred, she made her way to the Nativity scene, and laid her weeds alongside the many extravagant gifts near the manger. Suddenly the weeds transformed into the most beautiful flowers of the deepest red, with rich, lush green leaves.

Everybody gasped in disbelief at this miracle, and the flowers became known as Flores de Nochebuena (Christmas Eve flowers, or Holy Night flowers).

To this day these flowers bloom every December, and are the ones we know as poinsettia.

Black History Month

Black history month always seems to focus on the same few people: Mary Seacole, Rosa Parks, Nelson Mandela…. or else people from the worlds of sport or entertainment are chosen. I’m not saying that these people are not important, I’m just saying that the fields of scientists and inventors always seem to be neglected. Why not change that this year and find out about some of these people instead?

The Black Inventor Online Museum

BBC news – The black history you might not learn at school

What is Yom Kippur?

Yom Kippur is the most important date in the Jewish calendar, and even Jews who don’t celebrate other Jewish holidays will mark this one. It is the holiest day in the year in Judaism, and falls on the 10th day of the month of Tishri.

Yom Kippur translates as Day of Atonement and it is a day for represented for repenting sins. Atonement on this day is between Man and God only. Sins against other people have to be dealt with separately, and so the day before Yom Kippur is often spend asking for and giving forgiveness, and being charitable.

Jews have to fast on this day, beginning at sunset on the day before, and ending at sunset on the day itself. A festive meal is held before sunset on the previous day so that everybody eats well before the fast begins. Children under the age of 9 are not allowed to fast, and nor are women who have just given birth. In addition to this, it is not permitted to work; to wash or to wear perfumes, lotions or deodorant; or to wear leather.

The day is spent in prayer at the synagogue, and there is a communal confession of sin. The Ark, where the Torah is kept, remains open throughout the service, so people have to stand for the whole service. White is worn to symbolise purity.

Related posts: Sukkot     Hannukah